Wine Pairing Rules (plus a nifty infograph)

The-Healthy-Butcher-Wine-Pairing-RulesClick on the image above for a nifty infograph of food and wine pairing.

The following are three general rules, and 5 specific rules that will suit you well as you drink your way through our wines

The sheer volume of books and websites that exist to explain “the rules” of how to pair wines is astounding, which is why our General Rule #1 is the correct starting point.

GENERAL RULE #1:

There are no rules – only suggestions and personal preferences. If you like a combo you’ve had before, run with it.  Experiment and Enjoy!  If you have a glass of wine in your hand, realize how lucky you are and enjoy every drop.

GENERAL RULE #2:

If you’re cooking a recipe typical of a certain wine region, stick with wine from the same region. The foods of a country and the wines of a country have a historic bond that forms part of that country’s
culture.

GENERAL RULE #3:

When thinking of how to pair a food, concentrate on the dominant flavour.   That means that how a meat is prepared is usually more important than the type of meat itself. Chicken with a lemon butter sauce will call for a different more delicate wine to play off the sauce than a grilled chicken breast smothered in a spicy BBQ sauce.   So broad statements that say a certain meat pairs well with a certain wine are only sometimes correct.  The key is to think about the dominant flavour.

SPECIFIC CAN’T GO WRONG RULE #1:

Pair a dry Rosé when serving a wide range of Hors D’oevres.  A Rosé combines the crispness of a white with the fruitiness of a red, so it will pair well with the variety of flavours being served.

SPECIFIC CAN’T GO WRONG RULE #2:

Acid needs acid.  If squeezing a lemon on the food you’re serving is a good idea, pair with a light, acidic, unoaked white.  A pinot grigio or sauvignon blanc will be perfect.

Our pick: Perlage Pinot Grifio delle Venezie IGT

SPECIFIC CAN’T GO WRONG RULE #3:

Tannins need fat.  A marbled rib eye steak, grilled sausages or duck confit need a big red.

Our picks:

Eos Estate Cabernet Sauvignon Central Coast

Ryder Estate Central Coast Cabernet Sauvignon

Four Vines Lodi Old Vine Zindandel

Fanti Brunello di Montalcino DOCG

SPECIFIC CAN’T GO WRONG RULE #4:

Heat needs sweet.  e.g. Riesling with spicy Indian food.

Our pick: Southbrook Connect Organic White

SPECIFIC CAN’T GO WRONG RULE #5:

Earthy needs earthy.  e.g. Mushrooms, bison or venison pair beautifully with Pinot Noirs.

Our picks:

Southbrook Triomphe Pinot Noir VQA

Craftwork Estate Pinot Noir Monterey